Pre-Order Tyconius’ Exposition of the Apocalypse

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

He interpreted John’s visions in such a way as to make them relevant for the church of all times, similar to modern “idealist” interpretations.

INTRODUCTION

This should be a very interesting book to read.  If Tyconius had tied the visions of the Apocalypse to the era in which he believed it was written – during the reign of Nero – then it could be classified as a Modern Idealist work.  For the classification purposes of this website, this is a Historical Idealist book.  Due to the fourth century date of this work by Tyconius (AD 380), it appears to stand as one of the earliest extant commentaries on the Apocalypse of John.


Tyconius’ Exposition of the Apocalypse
By Francis X. Gumerlock

January 16, 2017

For decades scholars of early Christianity have awaited a reconstruction of Tyconius’ Expositio Apocalypseos (Exposition of the Apocalypse). Tyconius wrote it about 380 AD, but it did not survive in its entirety. Two fragments of it were found in Budapest and Turin, but they were incomplete and one shows evidence of interpolation. However, so many early medieval commentators on John’s Apocalypse made use of it, that patristic scholars believed that a fairly complete reconstruction was possible. Roger Gryson did just that in Vol. 107A of Corpus Christianorum Series Latina (Turnhout: Brepols, 2011)

Tyconius’ commentary is useful in many ways. He interpreted John’s visions in such a way as to make them relevant for the church of all times, similar to modern “idealist” interpretations. Negatively, he rarely placed the visions in the context of the political and religious situation facing the first century churches of Asia Minor. Positively, he saw that some passages in the Revelation were symbolic of the future persecution of Antichrist, the Second Coming, and the Last Judgment.

Read More at:  Pre-Order Tyconius’ Exposition of the Apocalypse


1988_bright_tyconius